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Scrap or Salvage: Deciding Whether to Repair or Replace after a Disaster Part III: Siding, Gutters, Drywall, Paint and Flooring

Homeowners face a long list of difficult decisions following a significant property loss. As a result, property owners must lean on experts such as property insurers, contractors, salvage experts, and others to assist in the response and recovery process. One of the most important decision revolves around whether to repair or replace the major components of a home. Below is the third post in a three-part series focusing on how to analyze home damage to determine the best course of action following a claim.

 

Scrap or Salvage: Deciding Whether to Repair or Replace after a Disaster Part II: Windows, Doors, Plumbing, Electrical, and HVAC
Homeowners face a long list of difficult decisions following a significant property loss. As a result, property owners must lean on experts such as property insurers, contractors, salvage experts, and others to assist in the response and recovery process. One of the most important decisions revolves around whether to repair or replace the major components of a home. Below is the second post in a three-part series focusing on how to analyze home damage in an effort to determine the best course of action following a claim.
Scrap or Salvage: Deciding Whether to Repair or Replace after a Disaster Part I: Roofing, Frame, and Foundation

Homeowners face a long list of difficult decisions following a significant property loss. As a result, property owners must lean on experts such as property insurers, contractors, salvage experts, and others to assist in the response and recovery process. One of the most important decision revolves around whether to repair or replace the major components of a home. Below is the first post in a three-part series focusing on how to analyze home damage in an effort to determine the best course of action following a claim.  

 

Six Tools Insurance Companies Are Using to Mitigate Fraud

Homeowner insurance fraud occurs when someone knowingly submits a false, inflated or misleading claim on his or her homeowner's policy. This type of fraud may appear in various forms. According to the Coalition Against Insurance Fraud, about 10 percent of property insurance losses are the result of fraud. Therefore, this type of insurance fraud directly influences the premiums that all property owners pay. In fact, the FBI estimates that insurance fraud costs the average U.S. family between $400 and $700 per year in the form of increased premiums alone.

What Policyholders Need to Know About Short-Term Leases

Absolutely nothing about moving out of your home while it undergoes repairs is easy or pleasant. Aside from the stress that the catastrophic damage inflicts when it happens, moving out of your home and completely displacing your family is never a straightforward process. But unfortunately, situations arise where it’s necessary to submit a property insurance claim for substantial home damage. When that happens, you’ll need to know a thing or two about short-term rentals.

Getting the Details Right at Move Out
1. Use a Checklist Most apartments and vacation rentals will supply you with a move in/move out checklist. This is often the same checklist managers use when inspecting a unit post move out. Walk through your new home before moving furniture in and look for any damage to the interior and exterior.